Mededeling

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Unknown warship Indonesia 1930s

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Tijd
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Unknown warship Indonesia 1930s

    ------------------------- Oorspronkelijk bericht -------------------------
    Onderwerp: Identity of Warship - 1930s
    Van: "Roy Lowey-Ball"
    Datum: Zo, 8 april, 2007 17:34
    Aan: admin@dutchfleet.net
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The attached photograph was found in a collection of my father's pictures that date from the 1930s when he was growing up in Tjandi on a sugar plantation in Indonesia. The black and white picture of the ship is attached. I would appreciate it if anyone knows the name of this vessel?


    Thank you. Hartelijk bedankt,
    Roy Lowey-Ball
    --
    1930caDutchWarship.jpg
    groet, Rob

  • #2
    Zicht op het achterschip

    Denk Amerikaans de New Orleans Class met een enkel 203mm L/55 in three triple turrets en twee kranen waarvan er rechts nog net de boom en de takel zijn te zien voor in totaal dacht ik 4 vliegtuigen type Seagull

    Maar zal verder zoeken foto is denk ik van midden jaren "30 (klok vuurleiding 1934/1935) wellicht een eerste reis en vlagvertoon.

    uss astoria zomer 1934 (made a shakedown cruise )

    During the summer of 1934, Astoria conducted a. lengthy shakedown cruise in the course of which she voyaged extensively in the Pacific. In addition to the Hawaiian Islands, the heavy cruiser also visited Samoa, Fiji, Sydney in Australia, and Noumea on the island of New Caledonia.

    Ook staat het hier niet bij is het toch aannemelijk dat het schip batavia heeft aangedaan

    De rest van deze klasse was naar Europa,alaska,zuid amerika of lag op de werf

    USS New Orleans (CA32) 12th April 1933 Broken up in October 1959.
    USS Astoria (CA34) 16th December 1933 Sunk on 9th August 1942.
    USS Minneapolis (CA36) 6th September 1933 Broken up in July 1960.
    USS Tuscaloosa (CA37) 15th November 1933 Broken up in July 1959.
    USS San Francisco (CA3 9th March 1933 Broken up in May 1961.
    USS Quincy (CA39) 19th June 1935 Sunk on 9th August 1942
    USS Vincennes (CA44) 21st May 1936 Sunk on 9th August 1942.
    --
    CA37-Tuscaloosa.jpg

    uss astoria 1.jpg

    uss astoria.jpg

    Reactie


    • #3
      After mount on USS Indianapolis CA-33 in July 1945
      Note the "boxy" look, typical of USN 8" (20.3 cm) designs of the 1920s
      --
      After mount on USS Indianapolis CA-33 in July 1945.jpg

      USN 8 inch 20.3 cm.jpg

      Reactie


      • #4
        wat houdt die klok in op dat schip? eerste foto

        Reactie


        • #5
          Range clock

          wat houdt die klok in op dat schip? eerste foto
          What are those large clock on this battleship?

          These large 'clocks' are commonly called range clocks, though the British called them concentration dials. Developed towards the end of WWI, they were part of a system to concentrate the fire of several ships onto the same target.

          In the days before WWII, the most accepted formation for battleships was the line of battle, where ships would line up nose to tail and fire broadsides at the enemy. The British found that due to the poor visibility in the North Sea, further hampered by funnel and gunfire smoke, it was fairly rare for all the ships in the line of battle to actually see the enemy. So large dials resembling clock faces were added to the front of the fore mast, and to the rear of the main mast, trainable to 30 degrees off center. These clock faces were solid white disks (though a couple of ships had open centers) with black numbers from 0-9. Similar to a clock, there was a short hand and a long hand; the short hand was blue with a diamond at the end, and the long hand was red with a circle at the end.

          Once a ship found the range to the target, it would display the range on the dials, with one hand indicating thousands of yards + 10,000, and the other hundreds of yards. So if both hands were on the 1, the range to target was 11,100 yards. Hash marks, called bearing indicators, were painted on the main gun turrets, giving observers the angle to target. With the range and bearing data from the ship in front or behind them to feed into their range keeping tables (fire control computers to us Yanks), and the proper adjustments made for the distance between the ships, their location in formation, etc, the gunnery officers on a battleship could target their guns on an enemy they could not see with a fair degree of accuracy. They could then pass the information on to the next ship in line, allowing the entire battle line to concentrate fire on an unseen enemy.

          These range clocks were fitted to British, American, Brazilian, and French battleships and cruisers. However, as first radio communication, and then radio-equipped spotting aircraft allowed for the instant and accurate transfer of targeting information, these clocks were phased out. By the dawn of WWII, only a few ships still had them, mostly the older American dreadnoughts. As each went into the yard for a refit, the clocks were removed.

          picture USS Utha's forecastle


          A view of Utah's bridge and foremast, January 21, 1919. The large dial with numbers at the center top was popularly known as a "range clock." This dial, along with one on the aft side of mainmast, was used to indicate the range to the target to other battleships in line ahead and astern. The numbers painted around the base of the turret (foreground) similarly indicated the azimuth, or direction, to the target. These two devices together, it was believed, would allow a squadron of battleships to concentrate their gunfire on a single target even if some of the ships couldn't actually see the target themselves due to smoke or weather conditions
          --
          Forecastle USS Utah.jpg

          clock.jpg

          Reactie


          • #6
            ------------------------- Oorspronkelijk bericht -------------------------
            Onderwerp: Re: Identity of Dutch Warship - 1930s
            Van: "Roy Lowey-Ball"
            Datum: Di, 10 april, 2007 22:51
            Aan: admin@dutchfleet.net
            --------------------------------------------------------------------------


            Thank you so much. I have looked at this picture off and on for years and had always assumed it was a Dutch ship. The other day I looked at every Dutch naval vessel of the 1930s I could find on the Internet and none of them resembled this ship which puzzled me.

            Thanks to you and your intrepid band of scholars, I believe you have solved the mystery pretty conclusively - it definitely looks like a New Orleans Class American cruiser. I am embarrassed to say that it never occurred to me that the picture was taken from the stern, LOL.

            Hey, please thank everyone who helped identify this ship for me. I am in your debt and my brothers will enjoy this as well.


            Bedankt aan iedereen, Rob!
            groet, Rob

            Reactie

            Working...
            X